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Monday, 26 October 2009

42 The 49 of 91

Previously I have visited and photographed the triangulation points on sheets 97 and 98 of the Ordnance Survey 1:50000 maps. I am now planning the same for sheet 91, and have identified the forty-nine trigs on this map. This tedious job is made easier using Memory Map software enabling magnification, but careful scrutiny of each kilometre square on the map is still required.


Sheet 91 includes the northern edge of The Howgills in the south, and up to Cross Fell in the northern Pennines in the north.

There are many remote hills here, often without footpaths, so it could make for some quite demanding walks, especially if more than one trig is bagged on particular outings. In contrast some of the trigs are within a few meters of a road.



This concept provides a framework for comprehensively covering an area and often leads to interesting places which would not otherwise have been found. One area of uncertainty on this map involves two trigs which are on the Warcop military training area with restricted access. Research will be needed to prevent this exercise going off with a bang!

After comments from a certain source here is a more typical trig.



2 comments:

Barrett Bonden said...

It may be a typical trig point but the canny choice of proportion makes it look far from typical. With a hammer and chisel, and a lot of time to spare, you could probably extract a fairly large scale model of Napes Needle from that thing.

Sir Hugh said...

BB - Just for you I have added a more "typical" pic.