Monday, 10 February 2014

Gyrn Ddu

Monday 10th February

Ascent was from the cottage Tan-y-Graig shown on the OS map. A zig zag stalkers path took me up to the col and a final ascent up the south ridge. The extensive summit cone is the rockiest jumble of awkward slippery granite boulders I have experienced anywhere including all the Munros. Great care was needed and it took me the best part of an hour to negotiate there and back to the summit from the grassy col. This is a serious little mountain.

The day had started with persistent rain and I had settled down to read The Old Ways by Robert Macfarlane. The current chapter covered walking with a Palestinian friend in The West Bank - very descriptive, and dangerous, and not a pleasant sounding environment. The book is a good read taking accounts of walking to a refreshingly different level.

At 10:00 am the rain stopped and the sun shone, and except for cloud on the summit I had a great day. It was just a joy to be back in the hills.
















IPad pics.

1. My summit ( with snow) can just be seen peeping over the left hand ridge halfway down.

2. My summit is highest one at left. In the way up.

3. A vintage iron gate which took my fancy.

4. The summit.

5. The rocky jumble leading to the summit.



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4 comments:

The Crow said...

Your last photo set my nerves on edge - wouldn't want to climb that alone!

Favorite picture is of the cottage behind the iron gate; good setting for a period piece movie. John Huston would have loved it.

Enjoy! Looks like you're having a wonderful holiday climbing mountains and hills.

The Crow said...

PS: how is its name pronounced?

welshpaddler said...

Hi Conrad,

You should have waved, we did the three tops of Yr Eifl today - walked in snow on main top but cloud came in.
We walked from Abersoch to Pwllheli on Sunday as the wind was forecast too high for the tops, which you confirm.

Probably off to Aberdaron on Tuesday for a coastal walk.

Bob

Sir Hugh said...

The Crow - well let's just say it was a challenge.

Thinking in English terms the cottage is reminiscent of Bronte writings.

Pronunciation of Welsh is incomprehensible, but I think this one is not far from the way it is spelt. Most people in Wales speak their language as well as English and all the signage on roads et al is in dual language - quite confusing when you are driving and trying to read it quickly.

Welshpaddler - perhaps we should both start wearing red carnations so we may recognise each other. So far, on the three Marilyns I have climbed I have seen nobody.