For newcomers

At the bottom of each post there is the word "comments". If you click on it you will see comments made by followers, and if you follow the instructions you may also comment and I always welcome that. I have found many people overlook this part of the blog which is often more interesting than the original post!

My blog nick-name is SIR HUGH. I'm not from the aristocracy - my middle name is Hugh which relates to the list of 282 hills in Scotland compiled by Sir Hugh Munro in 1891. I climbed my last one (Sgurr Mor) on 28th June 2009

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Saturday, 13 February 2021

Grubbins Wood 2

Friday 12th February 2021 - Grubbins Wood 

After twenty years living in Arnside and thinking I had walked every footpath, a few days ago I discovered a new extensive network of paths within ten minutes from home.

The start leads off just opposite my local convenience store in Silverdale Road where Redhills Road emerges. It runs downhill parallel with Silverdale Road behind the houses then splits with several options, all of which eventually take one down to the shoreline of our bay. On the first day of discovery I continued on the shore nearly to New Barns but then noticed a gateway into woods on the left. An information board informed me of Grubbins Wood nature reserve. The exploration here was then reserved for today.

As I had walked along the shoreline the nature reserve is on high up steep wooded shoreline which I had never explored. The reason was apparent from the information board. The wood extends back towards Arnside but there is no way out at the end. I had rebelliously thought I may be able to find a way but the furthest point ended up backing onto private house gardens so I returned along the higher path which gave  views across the bay through the trees and a therefore a more interesting way than the outward lower path. This is old mixed woodland and in spring and summer it would be more attractive than its skeletal appearance today. I did hear an industrious woodpecker tapping away but despite  trying I couldn't track it down.

I carried on and returned by other familiar routes having done about four miles of Lockdown walking. It was good to have something new to see so close to home, but I have to say that the embargo on exploring new ground further afield is getting to me quite seriously. I am keeping some sanity by rekindling my latent enjoyment of model making. 

Part of the newly discovered path network.

A bit further on I am looking down to Ashmeadow, and old substantial Victorian house that served as a private school until sometime in the 60s I think. Our railway viaduct can be seen across the bay, top right.

Memorial to the fallen ex-pupils of the school in both World Wars


Grubbins Wood nature reserve is high above on the left. New Barns, where one enters, is in the inlet before the spit of land in the centre. I think the photo conveys how sharply cold it was despite the bright blue skies

On the lower outward path in Grubbins Wood

The network of paths between the start at the end of Redhills Road and down to the shoreline is not shown in proper detail even on the 1:25 map, nor are the paths accurately shown in the wood. Ignore the orange route - it is just another of many plotted possibilities on my Memory Map.


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Snippets

Two more irritating phrases:

cocktail of drugs

that works for me

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The most riveting piece of news in The Guardian for a long time:

Conch shell/ shell in French museum found to be 17,000 year old musical wind instrument 


7 comments:

bowlandclimber said...

Pleased you found some new paths, the name Grubbin's doesn't immediately draw you in. I'm sure in the spring it will be a nice spot or is it a dog walkers' rendezvous. Shame there is no through access at the Redhill's end. Anyhow, you have given the rat something to nibble on.
I also found some woodland recently opened up which I shall explore further next week.
Just read on from the bottom of your report and seen the snippets. I'm cataloguing a list of irritating phrases that seem to be more in evidence during the pandemic than normal, I suppose there are a lot more press conferences and 'experts' wheeled out for their opinions without any journalistic training - like myself.
I even heard a recording of that conch being played.

Sir Hugh said...

BC - I reckon one could also lay claim to the blade of grass blown between the thumbs held vertically together.

Just at the moment, having only arisen half an hour ago, I am trying to formulate a "robust plan" for "going forward." The aim is to find one that "prevents this never happening again." but the problem is,I'm not sure what the "this" is.

bowlandclimber said...

By now your robust plan will have been put into action.
I've been watching the cricket - "this" should not happen again.
I think I've lost the will to go out.

Paul said...

It's surprising how it can take years to discover something that is so close to home. I lived in Didsbury, South Manchester for about 12 years before discovering Heaton Mersey Common, just half a mile from home! I only spotted it when looking at an aerial photo and wondering "what the hell is that?"! The entrances to it are at the end of dull residential streets so I never knew.

Sir Hugh said...

Paul - These are only small comforts in the present situation. In previous lockdowns I seemed to be able to interpret the rules so I could drive to quiet locations for walk on some new territory. I am of course in favour of having the restrictions with a view to regaining some control. I don't fancy one of those substantial fines that are being handed out.

gimmer said...

In a slightly different but associated vein, you may not be over-surprised to learn that as a result of your regularly featuring stones with carved inscriptions - and the stonemason of the works here suggesting something of the sort - I wrote such a message, which Joe carved, in Trajan Bold, on a nice piece of St Bees stone, which now sits proudly in the final wall - above, appropriately, the restored 'degenerate Roman' arch, I need hardly add.
Ozymandias could have willed no better.
Thus passeth . . . the lockdown up here.

Sir Hugh said...

gimmer - Perhaps you could get a replica of Ozy's bust from the British Museum and mount it proudly on the front end of the roof's apex?