For newcomers

At the bottom of each post there is the word "comments". If you click on it you will see comments made by followers, and if you follow the instructions you may also comment and I always welcome that. I have found many people overlook this part of the blog which is often more interesting than the original post!

My blog nick-name is SIR HUGH. I'm not from the aristocracy - my middle name is Hugh which relates to the list of 282 hills in Scotland compiled by Sir Hugh Munro in 1891. I climbed my last one (Sgurr Mor) on 28th June 2009

****************************

Friday, 22 March 2019

Endmoor and Gatebeck

Thursday walk with Pete - 21st. March 2019 - Endmoor and Gatebeck

After my relatively productive two mile walk the other day I have again found material for an interesting post from  a short walk. 

In the mid nineties I built two boats.  I'd enjoyed the building more than the sailing and they were both later sold. I would have taken on another project if my move to Arnside in 2000 had given me the space.  I did post (with photos) about those activities a while ago:

http://conradwalks.blogspot.com/search?q=boat+building

Shortly after starting this walk with Pete I saw a sign at Gatebeck for Fyne Boat Kits, and was surprised that I had not come across this place before. Fyne supply a big range of kits for small boats ranging from canoes and kayaks to larger sailing boats. For anybody interested HERE is a link to their website.

After Gatebeck the road climbed quite steeply in places all the way to our terminus at the Kirkby Lonsdale/Sedbergh road. Daffodils were everywhere in varying states of bloom.

Pete needs flatter terrain than this but he has been going well recently and he was fine with this steady climb and the welcome downhill all the way back.

There are thousands of properties dating back to the 17th Century and further in this area and they probably outnumber more modern dwellings and we tend to walk past and take them for granted.  There is often a date plaque above the door and I took a photo of one proclaiming 1744. That had me wondering what was happening that year and Wikipedia had many tidbits, the more interesting ones for me are shown below -  my Reader's Digest version of Wiki:


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

So 1744 was almost unbelievably as newsworthy as 2019 (so far), after all it isn't often that someone has declared war against us. 

Shortly after the M6 underpass we were on the tops with fine views all round.

I spied a tractor related machine for our enthusiast Alan R. It may be too far removed from his specific subject of agricultural tractors, but I have hopes. It was a weird contraption designed with no eye for beauty, more as though it had been cobbled together from bits of various other machines for some unidentifiable multi-function purpose, which, judging by the look of it had failed - we will see.

Further on another ancient farm building had a plaque for 1736, but we will save perusal of happenings that year for the moment.

Back at Café Ambio I think Pete was more than usual ready for his refreshing cuppa and an Ambio sized portion of carrot cake - I usually have their own flapjack which is like something from Shackleton's survival rations, but none the worse for that.





See plaque below


An unusual manipulation of this stream presumably for the farmer's benefit, most likely preventing an area of bog in the field?

Looking back to the M6 which we had passed under further back. We were now out on the tops getting fine views to the Shap fells and the Lake District.

My prize for the ugliest tractor. The inscription reads 646C

30 x zoom

The plaque below was on the adjoining building but I reckon it is relevant to this one


Our destination reached. The Kirkby Lonsdale/Sedbergh road - well done Pete




6 comments:

AlanR said...

Your 646c is a John Deere loading shovel. I don’t know much about these because we didn’t build dedicated loading shovels where I worked. The wheels are interesting and may be from a former life on a rubbish tip. They compress waste materials.
Your walk.certainly had some history.

Sir Hugh said...

Alan R - You never disappoint. I knee I had seen those spiky wheels somewhere but couldn't remember and of course the garbage tip is the answer.

bowlandclimber said...

Initially opening your post I thought you were on Exmoor. I wish I was.

Sir Hugh said...

BC - Me too. The locations were ok, but there are better and more adventurous.

Kendal grufties said...

Fyne Boat Kits are a great company - very helpful and knowledgeable - we get all our marine ply from them along with other boat sundries. It was even better when they were based in Burneside!
I enjoyed rereading your posts on boat building - I'd forgotten about the 14' skiff that predated your Bolger, looked great!

Sir Hugh said...

Kendal Grufties - I thought you may respond to that dangled carrot. I was more saddened to sell the skiff than the Bolger - I think the Woods are inspired designers - the skiff was designed by Mrs W. - one of those things that looks easy but isn't.