For newcomers

At the bottom of each post there is the word "comments". If you click on it you will see comments made by followers, and if you follow the instructions you may also comment and I always welcome that. I have found many people overlook this part of the blog which is often more interesting than the original post!

My blog nick-name is SIR HUGH. I'm not from the aristocracy - my middle name is Hugh which relates to the list of 282 hills in Scotland compiled by Sir Hugh Munro in 1891. I climbed my last one (Sgurr Mor) on 28th June 2009

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Tuesday, 22 May 2018

BRONTE WAY 2


Bronte Way, Day 2 - Thursden to near Haworth - Sunday 20th May 2018

A couple of hours driving from Longridge to the other side of Ponden reservoir near Haworth, and then back to Thursden where we left off yesterday evening had us walking by 9:55am.

Within a few hundred yards we had lost the path climbing up a steep, nettly, scrubby hillside and then straddling a barbed wire fence (small tear on my shorts) to gain the tarmac road, and then the old drovers road over Boulsworth Moor.

We came across a strange stone arch just off the track with little other evidence of the rest of the building for which it must have provided an imposing entrance. Googling later from home I found the following from a blog by Jimmy Lenman - you might like to browse his blog and website from the link below.  Jimmy is a serious academic - it's interesting how one thing leads to another:

PROFESSOR JAMES WILLIAM LENMAN B.A., M. Phil., Ph.D.

AREAS OF SPECIALISATION

Ethics, Metaethics, Philosophy of Action

AREAS OF COMPETENCE

Epistemology, Political Philosophy, History of Philosophy – Early Modern, Plato

The arch is apparently The Doorway to Pendle - see my photo in the slideshow (link below) and this extract from Jimmy's blog:

https://www.jimmylenman.com/stravaiging/87-boulsworth-hill-and-extwistle-moor19th-march-2016
"On the way here the track passes the strange arch known as the Doorway to Pendle which consists of the doorway, and only the doorway, of an old farmhouse built in 1672 and now, saving only the doorway, quite vanished..."

We were now being passed by occasional mountain bikers. The sun was hotter than yesterday and I was perspiring profusely with sweat running into my eyes, but the scenery was stunning with expansive moorland views with curlews and lapwings calling.

We saw a group of imposing boulders high up on our left, Deerstones I think. BC had to be restrained from romping up there.

I have never visited Wycoller and BC was keen for me to do so and we diverted accordingly. It was certainly worthwhile. Wycoller Hall, now ruined is the main feature. This village was allowed to crumble into obscurity, but has been restored in recent times; it is not accessible by car, but it still attracts many people and certainly worth a visit. There is lots of history and information which would make this post far too long, but Google as you wish. 

Walking up the the sun dappled, tree lined lane out of Wycoller we spied crags high up on the left and Foster's Leap, another of BC's bouldering venues. 

I culled a bit of info, from this blog: 
https://crosbyman66.wordpress.com/2014/04/19/the-atom-at-wycoller/

"It is believed that in 1714 Foster Cunliffe made the daring leap from the cliff to the top of the rocky outcrop. "

It looks suicidal to me. See the photos in the slideshow (link below.)

At Water Sheddles reservoir (OS spells it as two words on 1:50 and one on 1:25) we rested and had our second snack which was just as well.

After the reservoir the Bronte Way descended into a delightful steep sided ravine running parallel with the road, but completely belying the existence of anything man made anywhere near. Although it was a magical spot from here to Old Snap farm the going was hard on a rocky narrow up and own path, partly on the steep banking and then descending to and ascending from the stream.

We again lost the path above Ponden reservoir, and although only briefly lost, it involved an incredibly steep grass ascent to get back on again and I was pretty whacked at that point with the heat of the day being a major factor, but it was not far now to where we had parked the car.

At the start of Day 1 I said it would interesting to see how I coped with two successive days of nine miles. Both days involved a lot of ascent and some hard going, and in high temperatures particularly on Day 2. I felt fine at the end of Day 1, but was very tired at the end of Day 2 and it is obvious to me that I need more training before embarking on multi-day walks again. Having said this the Bronte Way, so far, has been an excellent and varied walk, and the weather was kind but a bit too warm on Day 2. The company was superb.

Apologies for poor map quality - best I could do.


CLICK HERE for slideshow


CLICK ON FIRST THUMBNAIL, THEN ON DOUBLE ARROW AT BOTTOM TO SEE FULL SCREEN WITH BLACK BACKGROUND

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I couldn't identify those boulders above Wycoller as we walked in. Where did you get the Deerstones from? Wish now I had wandered up to them.

Sir Hugh said...

BC - I've no idea where Deerstones came from. I wrote the post before writing the captions, then, like you wondered. I Googled and searched both map scales, and found nothing; best ignore it. I'm sure you have a better chance of getting more info. from the climbing angle, somebody will know,

gimmer said...

i am intrigued by this 'serious academic' you cite: i have not checked the weblink you give - if it is true, it marks an odd development in academia - the disciplines listed would be suspected of being perfect exemplars of David Lodge's satire and parody - 'you couldn't make it up'.

Mark said...

I've never been to Wycoller Conrad, but you've certainly peeked my interest. And in the Bronte Way for that matter.

Sir Hugh said...

gimmer - I couldn't agree more. Some of those subjects were a mystery to me - I haven't bothered to investigate further, although it is often interesting when something on the post leads you from one thing to another, but on this occasion I had already strayed a fair way from the originating item.
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Mark -Leaning from other posts is one of the attractions of blogging. Your own blog has proved that many times to me.

Sir Hugh said...

gimmer - I couldn't agree more. Some of those subjects were a mystery to me - I haven't bothered to investigate further, although it is often interesting when something on the post leads you from one thing to another, but on this occasion I had already strayed a fair way from the originating item.
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Mark -Leaning from other posts is one of the attractions of blogging. Your own blog has proved that many times to me.